Global advocacy

Exclusion of key populations from HIV prevention and treatment is often rooted in laws and policies that discriminate them. Therefore, policy change is often needed.

Impact on global policies

Advocacy at the highest levels provides an important avenue to influencing HIV and AIDS programming, policies and funding on a global, regional and national level. Bridging the Gaps advocates at health policy forums such as PEPFAR, the Global Fund, WHO, United Nations arms such as UNAIDS, and other treaty bodies and international conferences that have a significant and relevant impact on global policies.

Disproportionately affected

Key populations and their sexual partners account for 47 per cent of new HIV infections globally. In Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the annual increase in HIV infections has doubled over the past 20 years, with over 95 per cent of new infections occurring amongst key populations and their sexual partners.

Disproportionately affected

Key populations and their sexual partners account for 47 per cent of new HIV infections globally. In Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the annual increase in HIV infections has doubled over the past 20 years, with over 95 per cent of new infections occurring amongst key populations and their sexual partners.

More discrimination, less access

People do not all have equal access to HIV treatments: In some regions of the world sex workers, people who use drugs and LGBT people, including those living with HIV, face additional challenges in trying to access these. In these countries they face discrimination and violence. This restricts their access to health care, justice, freedom and safety, ultimately increasing their likelihood of contracting HIV. In addition, civil society organisations formed by and focusing on these groups receive less funding.

That is why Bridging the Gaps partners jointly advocate at global and regional levels to call for access to health care for key populations and sufficient funding for organisations that work towards achieving this. In-country partners work to hold their governments accountable for the fulfilment of key populations’ rights. At the same time, the work of in-country partners and the experiences of communities fuel advocacy at global and regional levels.